Pear tart

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Tart with caramelized pear

Everyone spends all of autumn talking about apples, but right now, pears and I are having a moment.  Earlier this week I made caramelized pears.  Amazing.  With gelato.  More amazing.  I had a few of those caramelized pears left over and thought I might try using them instead of apples in a simple tart.

Puff pastry, pear, sea salt, butter, sugar

Puff pastry, pear, sea salt, butter, sugar

I’ve made Deb’s apple mosaic tart before (with apples), and its lovely, easy and tasty, so I started with that.  I cut the puff pastry, sugar and butter for baking down by about a quarter since I had eaten quite a few of the pears I had made earlier and didn’t think I’d have enough to make a full sheet.

Even still I wound up with a little extra space in the middle of the tart, but this was no problem.  When I first made baked brie, I figured out how to use puff pastry to make leaves and rosettes.  I made a few rosettes from the trimmings of the puff pastry, set them in the extra space, and gave them a brushing of the drippings I got when I caramelized the pears.

If its possible, I think this turned out better than the original recipe.  I often find that raw apples in tarts and pies don’t cook all the way through.  The apples are tougher than the crust and will fall off because they are too solid, or when you take a bite you’ll come a way with most of the filling and leave behind empty crust.  Here, since the pears have already been softened in the oven, the structure comes from the puff pastry.  Every bite is soft and perfect.  This tart tasted the way I always imagine tarts will taste when I look at the beautiful pictures in recipe books.

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Making caramel topping

Making caramel topping

A few tips:

I think it’s a good idea to check on your tart a few times while it’s baking.  Puff pastry can be unforgiving when it burns, and mine started to brown a little sooner than I wanted, at about 20 minutes or so.  The upside of having the pears pre-cooked was that it didn’t harm the tart at all to take it out a few minutes earlier than called for by the original recipe.

To make rosettes, stretch out a thin slice of puff pastry so its about the size of your palm and has a slight arc.  Starting with the lower corner of the arc, pinch one end together, then roll inward, lightly pinching and pressing the inner edge to the bottom of the flower.  Set lightly on the puff pastry and brush with pear drippings or an egg white, so that they won’t burn.  You could also use a butter knife to cut out little almond shapes.  Press lightly down the middle with the knife edge to make the leaf vein, pinch gently along that seam, and voilà, leaves!  Maybe I’ll make baked brie soon and take pictures to give a better example

Cut a long, slightly curved piece of puff pastry

Cut a long, slightly curved piece of puff pastry

Pinch one end together and gently roll inward to create a florette

Pinch one end together and gently roll inward to create a florette

Puff pastry florette

Puff pastry florette

This tart can be made in the afternoon and set aside to be enjoyed after dinner, but honestly, it will never taste quite as magical as it does fresh out of the oven.  Afternoon dessert is underrated.

Fresh sliced pears are also a great idea, and now I’m wondering how apples would do with the caramelization process that went into these pears.  If anyone tries, let me know.

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